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CloudFlare Offers Free DDoS Protection to Public Interest Websites

18 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Blog

A project launched by CloudFlare, a provider of website performance and security services, allows organizations engaged in news gathering, civil society and political or artistic speech to use the company’s distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) protection technology for free.cloudflarelogo

The goal of the project, dubbed Galileo, is to protect freedom of expression on the Web by helping sites with public interest information from being censored through online attacks, according to the San Francisco-based company.

“If a website participating in Project Galileo comes under attack, CloudFlare will extend full protection to ensure the site stays online — no matter its location, no matter its content,” the Project Galileo website says.

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Zerto Raises $26 Million in Series D

16 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Startups

New investor Harmony Partners led the financing, with participation by all current investors: Battery Ventures, Greylock IL, RTP Ventures and U.S. Venture Partners.zerto-red-on-white-logo-small

The round brings total financing to more than $60 million and provides a war chest to allow Zerto to expand its footprint, maintain long-term independence and focus major R&D efforts around the recently launched Cloud Fabric initiative for workload mobility in hybrid clouds.

With more than 500 enterprise customers and 100 managed cloud service providers (SCPs) including Terremark, KPN and Colt offering cloud DR powered by Zerto, the company has built a base to corner the market for virtualized DR services.

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Amazon, Google Spar Over SSDs In Cloud

14 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Blog

Amazon Web Services is making solid state disks the standard storage for its Elastic Block Store service used with running instances, and is setting the price to compete with Google Compute Engine.google_vs_amazon

Solid state was available previously on Amazon’s EC2, but it tended to be associated with specialized server types designed to provide data management and high transaction throughput. The storage Amazon announced on Tuesday is general-purpose storage volumes based on SSDs, priced at $.10 per GB per month.

If general-purpose SSDs don’t provide a high enough input/output rate, customers can purchase additional capacity for $.125 per GB per month for each additional 1000 IOPS provisioned times. The cost is reduced by the share of the month in which they’re actually used — for example, if they are used for half the month, the bill would be 50% of what would otherwise be a month’s total.

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Nimboxx Raised $12 Million in Series A

11 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Startups

NIMBOXX, Inc. unveiled its ‘atomic unit’ of the software-defined data center, an all-in-one solution that puts a hyper-scale computing model within reach for organizations of all sizes.eNn-eAdE_400x400

The company also announced it has raised $12 million in Series A funding from SMC Holdings, a Hong Kong-based institutional investor with a track record in backing U.S. technology companies.

The data center is undergoing a transformation. Legacy data center models are not equipped to enable modern elastic computing, 20-year old storage architectures no longer scale to meet data demands, and virtualization has become commoditized. Cloud providers such as Amazon and Google have employed a new data center paradigm, building software-defined data centers to deliver massively scalable services with efficiency that few others can match.

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Hybrid Clouds: What Are They Good For?

07 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Blog

Hybrid cloud has been a headliner topic at almost every major IT event this year, whether it’s Microsoft beefing up Azure at TechEd, EMC and VMware making hybrid products and a joint reference design a centerpiece of keynotes at EMC World, or IBM announcing OpenStack hybrid support for Cloud Manager.iStock_000020265568Small

To listen to these vendors, hybrid cloud is the new de facto standard data center architecture, and anyone not shuttling workloads back and forth is falling behind.

But what do IT leaders making those data center decisions think?

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Oracle Buys Mini Me In $5.3 Billion Micros Deal

04 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Blog

Oracle made official its rumored acquisition of Micros Systems on Monday, announcing a whopping $5.3 billion deal for a company that’s a small version of Oracle itself, with a mature software business, a sizeable hardware business, and a fledgling foothold in the cloud.oracle-ecommerce-integration

Like Oracle, Micros gets the biggest share of its revenue (about 40%) from software maintenance. Maintenance accounted for $482 million of the company’s $1.2 billion in fiscal 2013 revenue. New software sales, by comparison, accounted for only 11.3%, or $143 million. And, like Oracle, Micros sells hardware, though mostly point-of-sale specialized workstations and terminals used in restaurant, hotel, and retail settings. This business accounted for 21%, or $269 million, of Micros’s 2013 revenue.

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Cloud Trends To Watch: Structure 2014

04 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Blog

Microsoft still thinks bigness is goodness, and if you’ve gotten big, it’s because you were meant to rule a given area of the industry.binocular

Microsoft Corporate VP Scott Guthrie predicts that the cloud will sort itself out into a few really big suppliers. “We eventually think there will be three hyper-scale suppliers out there — Google, Amazon, and us,” with hyper-scale defined as a data center provider who can add a million servers a year.

There’s an element of truth to the argument that those vendors who build really big data centers and also manage them with a limited number of people have economies of scale that are hard to match. But that’s not the whole story in the cloud. The cloud is essentially a more level playing field. Public standards are in use, and many open source technologies play well together. A Microsoft that respects integration with a wide variety of open source and the use of Web services standards would be a different Microsoft than the one we’re still confronted with today, whatever its efforts at self-reform.

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For Immediate Release

Jordan Rayboy  receives Certified Employee Retention Specialist (CERS) designation from NAPS

April 4, 2014 | Atlanta, GA

Jordan Rayboy, has received the Certified Employee Retention Specialists (CERS) designation on March 26, 2014 from the National Association of Personnel Services.

The Certified Employee Retention Specialists (CERS) is the only national designation recognized globally by the personnel services and staffing industry.  A CERS must be knowledgeable on employment laws and regulations, as well as be a consultative expert who can work with clients not to just find top talent, but a consultant that can help them retain the top talent already on their team. CERS have the highest standard of business practices set forth by the National Association of Personnel Services. Jordan Rayboy, CPC/CERS, joins approximately 52 Certified Employee Retention Specialists in the nation, a designation that began in 2006.

“Attaining National certification through NAPS is one way recruiters can set themselves apart from the rest” said , Carolyn Boyer, CPC and NAPS Vice President.  “It ensures that industry professionals are knowledgeable on the most current employment laws, the highest ethical standards and the best business practices as well as confidentially assessing a client’s retention issues and advise them with specific recommendations as their trusted retention advisor.

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10 Things Only Exceptional Bosses Give Employees

02 Jul 2014, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Blog

Good bosses have strong organizational skills. Good bosses have solid decision-making skills. Good bosses get important things done.Worlds-Best-Boss

Exceptional bosses do all of the above — and more. (And we remember them forever.) Sure, they care about their company and customers, their vendors and suppliers. But most importantly, they care to an exceptional degree about the people who work for them.

And that’s why they’re so rare.

Extraordinary bosses give every employee:

1. Autonomy and independence.

Great organizations are built on optimizing processes and procedures. Still, every task doesn’t deserve a best practice or a micro-managed approach. (Here’s looking at you, manufacturing industry.)

Engagement and satisfaction are largely based on autonomy and independence. I care when it’s “mine.” I care when I’m in charge and feel empowered to do what’s right.

Plus, freedom breeds innovation: Even heavily process-oriented positions have room for different approaches. (Still looking at you, manufacturing.)

Whenever possible, give your employees the autonomy and independence to work the way they work best. When you do, they almost always find ways to do their jobs better than you imagined possible.

2. Clear expectations.

While every job should include some degree of independence, every job does also needbasic expectations for how specific situations should be handled.

Criticize an employee for offering a discount to an irate customer today even though yesterday that was standard practice and you make that employee’s job impossible. Few things are more stressful than not knowing what is expected from one day to the next.

When an exceptional boss changes a standard or guideline, she communicates those changes first — and when that is not possible, she takes the time to explain why she made the decision she made, and what she expects in the future.

3. Meaningful objectives.

Almost everyone is competitive; often the best employees are extremely competitive–especially with themselves. Meaningful targets can create a sense of purpose and add a little meaning to even the most repetitive tasks.

Plus, goals are fun. Without a meaningful goal to shoot for, work is just work.

No one likes work.

4. A true sense of purpose.

Everyone likes to feel a part of something bigger. Everyone loves to feel that sense of teamwork and esprit de corps that turns a group of individuals into a real team.

The best missions involve making a real impact on the lives of the customers you serve. Let employees know what you want to achieve for your business, for your customers, and even your community. And if you can, let them create a few missions of their own.

Feeling a true purpose starts with knowing what to care about and, more importantly, why to care.

5. Opportunities to provide significant input.

Engaged employees have ideas; take away opportunities for them to make suggestions, or instantly disregard their ideas without consideration, and they immediately disengage.

That’s why exceptional bosses make it incredibly easy for employees to offer suggestions. They ask leading questions. They probe gently. They help employees feel comfortable proposing new ways to get things done. When an idea isn’t feasible, they always take the time to explain why.

Great bosses know that employees who make suggestions care about the company, so they ensure those employees know their input is valued — and appreciated.

6. A real sense of connection.

Every employee works for a paycheck (otherwise they would do volunteer work), but every employee wants to work for more than a paycheck: They want to work with and for people they respect and admire–and with and for people who respect and admire them.

That’s why a kind word, a quick discussion about family, an informal conversation to ask if an employee needs any help — those moments are much more important than group meetings or formal evaluations.

A true sense of connection is personal. That’s why exceptional bosses show they see and appreciate the person, not just the worker.

7. Reliable consistency.

Most people don’t mind a boss who is strict, demanding, and quick to offer (not always positive) feedback, as long as he or she treats every employee fairly.

(Great bosses treat each employee differently but they also treat every employee fairly. There’s a big difference.)

Exceptional bosses know the key to showing employees they are consistent and fair is communication: The more employees understand why a decision was made, the less likely they are to assume unfair treatment or favoritism.

8. Private criticism.

No employee is perfect. Every employee needs constructive feedback. Every employee deserves constructive feedback. Good bosses give that feedback.

Great bosses always do it in private.

9. Public praise.

Every employee — even a relatively poor performer — does something well. Every employee deserves praise and appreciation. It’s easy to recognize some of your best employees because they’re consistently doing awesome things. (Maybe consistent recognition is a reason they’re your best employees? Something to think about.)

You might have to work hard to find reasons to recognize an employee who simply meets standards, but that’s okay: A few words of recognition–especially public recognition–may be the nudge an average performer needs to start becoming a great performer.

10. A chance for a meaningful future.

Every job should have the potential to lead to greater things. Exceptional bosses take the time to develop employees for the job they someday hope to land, even if that job is with another company.

How can you know what an employee hopes to do someday? Ask.

Employees will only care about your business after you first show you care about them. One of the best ways is to show that while you certainly have hopes for your company’s future, you also have hopes for your employees’ futures.

 

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140630120036-20017018-10-things-only-exceptional-bosses-give-employees

Rugged Cloud Inc. was founded to address the needs of converged infrastructure and cloud management platforms. The company develops purpose-built rugged servers and provides professional services to help analyze, design and deploy extremely reliable platforms for both VMware and Openstack cloud management platforms.rc-logo-email

“At Rugged Cloud we believe the underlying infrastructure should not fail. We have taken the concepts of system level hardening which the military uses to deploy information technology for the warfighter and applied those design principals to commercial-grade cloud management platforms. We are capable and proud to offer our systems with military grade hardware at commercial prices,” stated Michael Cobb, Founder and CTO.

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