RayboyIS in the News

 

Someone who has kept a job through serial downsizing is assumed to be a valued top performer, she adds. And to companies looking to rebuild, being steadily employed suggests you’re stable and loyal, and therefore likelier to provide a return on investment should you be hired. For employees who held onto jobs during corporate downsizing, shouldering more work without complaint became business as usual. Many were grateful to be employed while others around them were felled by layoffs. “There’s almost a desirability to it,” Masse says.

That was then. As the economy improves, the overworked wonder if they can strike a better deal elsewhere.

In a poll of 1,400 people at the end of 2010, some 84 percent of respondents said they plan to actively look for a new job in 2011, up from 60 percent the preceding year. Just five percent said they’d stick with their current job according to the survey by Manpower subsidiary Right Management, Philadelphia.

And headhunters are on the prowl for the discontented.

If workers can stomach it, now is the time to jump companies, especially if the prospects of a raise or promotion from your current employer are slim, says Melissa Cappas Masse, a principal and general manager at the Waltham, Mass.-based staffing firm Winter, Wyman. While the number of unemployed workers vying for the same jobs means there’s more competition, it’s not necessarily stiffer competition, she says. Indeed, the fact that so many who apply for a job are out of work can give a fully employed candidate an advantage.

“Companies often prefer passive candidates who are still working,” Masse says. “Someone without employment gaps looks more attractive to them.” Just by virtue of your employment status, your resume might advance past the weeding-out process because you’re demonstrably wanted.

Fairly or not, hiring authorities make assumptions about people who are out of work for more than a few months. Either they aren’t trying hard enough or they don’t have what it takes, says Jordan Rayboy, CEO of Rayboy Insider Search headquartered in Davie, Fla.

In good times and bad, “Employers would always rather hire an A player,” he says.

Read the full story at http://www.mercurynews.com/jobs-careers-education/ci_17847894?nclick_check=1

 

Time to Jump Ship? Jordan Rayboy Featured in The Roanoke Times

02 May 2011, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in News

For employees who held onto jobs during corporate downsizing, shouldering more work without complaint became business as usual. Many were grateful to be employed while others around them were felled by layoffs. That was then. As the economy improves, the overworked wonder if they can strike a better deal elsewhere.

In a poll of 1,400 people at the end of 2010, some 84 percent of respondents said they plan to actively look for a new job in 2011, up from 60 percent the preceding year. Just five percent said they’d stick with their current job according to the survey by Manpower subsidiary Right Management, Philadelphia.

And headhunters are on the prowl for the discontented. If workers can stomach it, now is the time to jump companies, especially if the prospects of a raise or promotion from your current employer are slim, says Melissa Cappas Masse, a principal and general manager at the Waltham, Mass.-based staffing firm Winter, Wyman.

While the number of unemployed workers vying for the same jobs means there’s more competition, it’s not necessarily stiffer competition, she says. Indeed, the fact that so many who apply for a job are out of work can give a fully employed candidate an advantage.

“Companies often prefer passive candidates who are still working,” Masse says. “Someone without employment gaps looks more attractive to them.”

Just by virtue of your employment status, your résumé might advance past the weeding-out process because you’re demonstrably wanted. “There’s almost a desirability to it,” Masse says.

Someone who has kept a job through serial downsizing is assumed to be a valued top performer, she adds. And to companies looking to rebuild, being steadily employed suggests you’re stable and loyal, and therefore likelier to provide a return on investment should you be hired.

Fairly or not, hiring authorities make assumptions about people who are out of work for more than a few months. Either they aren’t trying hard enough or they don’t have what it takes, says Jordan Rayboy, CEO of Rayboy Insider Search headquartered in Davie, Fla.

In good times and bad, “Employers would always rather hire an A player,” he says.

Read the full story at http://www.roanoke.com/job/careerDevelopment/changingcareers/articles/wb/283100

 

For employees who held onto jobs during corporate downsizing, shouldering more work without complaint became business as usual. Many were grateful to be employed while others around them were felled by layoffs. That was then. As the economy improves, the overworked wonder if they can strike a better deal elsewhere.

In a poll of 1,400 people at the end of 2010, some 84 percent of respondents said they plan to actively look for a new job in 2011, up from 60 percent the preceding year. Just five percent said they’d stick with their current job according to the survey by Manpower subsidiary Right Management, Philadelphia.

And headhunters are on the prowl for the discontented. If workers can stomach it, now is the time to jump companies, especially if the prospects of a raise or promotion from your current employer are slim, says Melissa Cappas Masse, a principal and general manager at the Waltham, Mass.-based staffing firm Winter, Wyman.

While the number of unemployed workers vying for the same jobs means there’s more competition, it’s not necessarily stiffer competition, she says. Indeed, the fact that so many who apply for a job are out of work can give a fully employed candidate an advantage.

“Companies often prefer passive candidates who are still working,” Masse says. “Someone without employment gaps looks more attractive to them.”

Just by virtue of your employment status, your résumé might advance past the weeding-out process because you’re demonstrably wanted. “There’s almost a desirability to it,” Masse says.

Someone who has kept a job through serial downsizing is assumed to be a valued top performer, she adds. And to companies looking to rebuild, being steadily employed suggests you’re stable and loyal, and therefore likelier to provide a return on investment should you be hired.

Fairly or not, hiring authorities make assumptions about people who are out of work for more than a few months. Either they aren’t trying hard enough or they don’t have what it takes, says Jordan Rayboy, CEO of Rayboy Insider Search headquartered in Davie, Fla.

In good times and bad, “Employers would always rather hire an A player,” he says.

Read the full story at http://www.mercurynews.com/jobs-careers-education/ci_17847894?nclick_check=1

 

Time to Jump Ship? Jordan Rayboy Featured in Jobs.com

02 May 2011, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in News

For employees who held onto jobs during corporate downsizing, shouldering more work without complaint became business as usual. Many were grateful to be employed while others around them were felled by layoffs. That was then. As the economy improves, the overworked wonder if they can strike a better deal elsewhere.

In a poll of 1,400 people at the end of 2010, some 84 percent of respondents said they plan to actively look for a new job in 2011, up from 60 percent the preceding year. Just five percent said they’d stick with their current job according to the survey by Manpower subsidiary Right Management, Philadelphia.

And headhunters are on the prowl for the discontented. If workers can stomach it, now is the time to jump companies, especially if the prospects of a raise or promotion from your current employer are slim, says Melissa Cappas Masse, a principal and general manager at the Waltham, Mass.-based staffing firm Winter, Wyman.

While the number of unemployed workers vying for the same jobs means there’s more competition, it’s not necessarily stiffer competition, she says. Indeed, the fact that so many who apply for a job are out of work can give a fully employed candidate an advantage.

“Companies often prefer passive candidates who are still working,” Masse says. “Someone without employment gaps looks more attractive to them.”

Just by virtue of your employment status, your résumé might advance past the weeding-out process because you’re demonstrably wanted. “There’s almost a desirability to it,” Masse says.

Someone who has kept a job through serial downsizing is assumed to be a valued top performer, she adds. And to companies looking to rebuild, being steadily employed suggests you’re stable and loyal, and therefore likelier to provide a return on investment should you be hired.

Fairly or not, hiring authorities make assumptions about people who are out of work for more than a few months. Either they aren’t trying hard enough or they don’t have what it takes, says Jordan Rayboy, CEO of Rayboy Insider Search headquartered in Davie, Fla.

In good times and bad, “Employers would always rather hire an A player,” he says.

Read the full story at http://galvestoncountyjobs.com/career.lasso?wcd=2970

 

The employment market is saturated  with various resources for job seekers. While some of them offer consistent advice (always send a cover letter, tailor your résumé and wait for the employer to bring up salary), the truth is that conflicting information exists.

Especially when it comes to what employers are looking for in a new hire.

A recent survey from Express Employment Professionals, one of the nation’s largest staffing firms, showed that the top three aspects that employers are looking for in a new hire are credible work history (97 percent), job experience (88 percent) and specific skills (87 percent). More than 15,000 current and former clients of Express were surveyed for the first quarter of 2011.

To get the story straight, we asked hiring managers to tell us the most impressive qualities they see in potential job candidates. Here’s what they said (in no specific order):

1. Results “Something I always ask anyone I interview is, ‘what is something you do better than anyone else in the world?’ with the follow-up of, ‘what is the evidence of this gift?’ I think that truly driven, passionate people leave behind them a wake of results wherever they go. Talking about measurable outcomes separates the contenders from pretenders.” — C. Daniel Crosby, corporate psychologist and president, Crosby Performance Consulting

“Candidates that can tell me an anecdote about how they got something done, against all odds, really impress me the most. Those who understand the rules and conduct of business but are not afraid to push the envelope a bit in the name of a job well done.” — Jennifer Prosek, author “Army of Entrepreneurs” and CEO, CJP Communications

2. Good fit “There is no giant totem poll of qualities that makes one person more impressive or better than another. People who excel in one position are going to flounder in another if it doesn’t fit their talents, interests and skills.” — Ann Latham, president of Uncommon Clarity, Inc.

3. Preparation “Showing that they have done their research by knowing something about me, and my business.” — Kenneth Sean Polley, president, Global Asset Management Group

“When a candidate asks really great questions it demonstrates not only their interest in our company and the issues we’re facing, but also their research skills. Most impressive are those who think about what they discovered in their research and then ask really great questions.” — Anita S. Fisher, marketing communications manager, Briggs & Stratton Corporation

4. Initiative “I look for the ability to take a project and run with it, to function independently and creatively with a minimum of oversight.” — Kathryn Minshew, co-founder and editor-in-chief, Pretty Young Professional

“Proactivity — the act of taking initiative, being able to operate independently and finding a way to get things done.” — Jordan Rayboy, recruiter, Rayboy Insider Search

Read the full story at http://www.newsday.com/classifieds/jobs/impressive-job-candidate-qualities-1.2839351

 

“5. Research the companies that will be there, and categorize them as “A targets” and “B targets” to make the most of your time at the job fair, says Jordan Rayboy, president and CEO of Rayboy Insider Search, a headhunting firm specializing in placing people within the niche area of Information Technology data storage.
“Part of that research is a list of questions prepared to showcase your talents. Exhibit your qualifications for the market by the quality and depth of the questioning. For example, with a sales opportunity, ask about territory, quota, or accelerators once you’re past quota,” Rayboy says.  Or, ask company-specific questions: Why do people stay there? What’s working well for the company? If line managers are present, ask them, “If you were the CEO, what would you change? Can the company improve?”

10. Ask closing-oriented questions at the end of your conversation with each recruiter, Rayboy says.
For example, “Do you have any concerns that make you think I’m not qualified or would prevent you from moving forward with me in the process?” “Most interviewers are not candid enough to say, ‘Thanks, I don’t think is a fit because of this, this and this.’ They say, ‘We’ll get back to you.’ They won’t voice it unless you ask. And you might have all the experience they’re looking for, but perhaps it wasn’t the focus of the interview or the conversation. They may think you don’t have it when you have it by the boatload,” Rayboy says. A recruiter may say, “I’m concerned you haven’t managed enough people,” and you could counter with, “I’m glad you mentioned that, because I managed 75 people in this position for x number of years,” Rayboy says.

The last question is, “What’s the next step in the process?”
“Ask their timeframe: how soon are they looking to bring someone on board? Is it by the beginning of the next quarter or yesterday? Then ask, ‘Would you like to move forward with me in the process? I’m interested in pursuing this and could add value to your organization. What do you need to do to get the next step scheduled?’ If you get push back, reiterate the question about whether something is preventing them from calling you back. Sometimes they might be more forthcoming the second time you ask,” Rayboy says. However, there is a limit to being insistent. Don’t be too overbearing. Use your best judgment.

Read the full story at http://www.civilianjobs.com/March.AprilCJN2011_article_successfuljobfairs.htm

 

“Jordan Rayboy, who heads Rayboy Insider Search, a recruiting firm serving the data storage industry, said that poaching is something a good recruiter is always trying to do. The person they truly want is almost always a top performer doing the job successfully for one of their competitors,” Rayboy said.  Rayboy said if there is one trend that he has seen recently, it’s that more and more companies are offering increasingly generous bounties in return for employee referrals; those bounties are now in the range of $2,000 to $5,000, he said.”

Read the full story at http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/print/9215054/Talent_battle_in_India_coming_to_U.S._court_?taxonomyName=Staff+Management&taxonomyId=57

 

“Take a Walk” Jordan Rayboy Featured in The Ladders.com

07 Mar 2011, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in News

“There’s more than one way to skin a cat, and more than one way to convince a candidate to take that final step and commit to a position. How do you win that argument and close the deal? Like most recruiters, Jordan Rayboy, president and CEO of Rayboy Insider Search, a data storage recruiting firm, has been there — found the perfect candidate who hems and haws after the hiring manager has made an offer.”

Read the full story at https://recruit.theladders.com/recruiter-resource-center/take-a-walk?link_id=

 

Jordan Rayboy quoted in The Ladders.com

28 Feb 2011, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in News

Jordan Rayboy quoted in The Ladders.com – “Should You Tell One Company You’re Accepting Another Offer?”

“Once you’ve received a job offer you plan to accept, one of your duties is to let your other prospects know, if you haven’t already. How much should you tell them? Read on for advice on how to handle this delicate communication. “Unsurprisingly, informing companies you’re taking an offer can result in a bidding war. As a rule, Lamb advises clients not to participate in the game, since “It often leaves both organizations feeling a bit manipulated,” she said.  Not all career professionals agree. Jordan Rayboy, president and CEO of Rayboy Insider Search and a member of the Pinnacle Society of executive recruiters, has no qualms about counseling his data storage professional clients to negotiate the strongest possible offer if they have multiple options.

“You have more leverage to negotiate a stronger offer if you have multiple options,” Rayboy said. “I don’t think there’s anything unethical about trying to negotiate the best possible offer for yourself.”

Read the full story at http://www.theladders.com/career-advice/should-you-tell-one-company-youre-accepting-another-offer

 

Jordan Rayboy quoted in: The wow factor: Impressive job candidate qualities at MSN Careerbuilder Article

The employment market is saturated with various resources for job seekers. While some of them offer consistent advice (always send a cover letter, tailor your résumé and wait for the employer to bring up salary), the truth is that conflicting information exists. Especially when it comes to what employers are looking for in a new hire. A recent survey from Express Employment Professionals, one of the nation’s largest staffing firms, showed that the top three aspects that employers are looking for in a new hire are credible work history (97 percent), job experience (88 percent) and specific skills (87 percent). More than 15,000 current and former clients of Express were surveyed for the first quarter of 2011.

To get the story straight, we asked hiring managers to tell us the most impressive qualities they see in potential job candidates. Here’s what they said (in no specific order):

“Proactivity — the act of taking initiative, being able to operate independently and finding a way to get things done.” — Jordan Rayboy, recruiter, Rayboy Insider Search

Read the full story at http://msn.careerbuilder.com/Article/MSN-2518-Job-Search-The-wow-factor-Impressive-job-candidate-qualities/