Data Protection Tag

 

Should These Emerging Storage Startups Be On Your Radar?

11 Sep 2015, Posted by Jeska Rayboy in Blog

Traditionally, data storage has been all about capacity — how many terabytes, petabytes, even exabytes, can I squeeze into that system? But, today, speed and performance have become as important as capacity, if not more so, and that’s led to booming sales of flash storage and hyper-converged systems.emerging technology company

And that’s why the storage technology arena has recently been one of the most active segments of the IT industry. Some like Pure Storage have been around for a while and attracted a lot of attention — and a lot of venture funding. Others are just getting out of the starter’s block.

Here’s a look at 10 emerging vendors in the storage arena that you should be aware of:

Cohesity

Santa Clara, Calif.

Top Executive: CEO Mohit Aron

Storage startup Cohesity exited stealth mode in June with $70 million in venture financing and unveiled the availability of its first data storage system.

That system, the Cohesity Data Platform, is an infinitely scalable converged platform that provides a full range of integrated data-protection services, including storage of backup and archival data, and cloud connectivity. Data can be easily cloned for test and development. It also includes an integrated data analytics software application and allows integration with customers’ choice of application.

 

DataGravity

Nashua, N.H.

Top Executive: CEO Paula Long

After several years of development, DataGravity exited stealth in 2014 with its “data-aware” Discovery Series storage systems that help IT managers and line-of-business users store, protect, search and govern their data. At the core of the system is the DataGravity Engine that analyzes data as it’s ingested.

The company sells exclusively through the channel and recruits solution providers to its DataGravity Partner Network.

 

Hedvig

Santa Clara, Calif.

Top Executive: CEO Avinash Lakshman

Hedvig exited stealth mode in March with the introduction of a software-defined storage system the company said not only breaks the tie between storage software and hardware but also provides the widest range of storage services.

The Hedvig Distributed Storage Platform, based on software-defined storage technology, provides a level of abstraction that lets compute platforms consume storage regardless of whether it is file, block or object storage. It provides a wide range of services, including replication, disaster recovery, compression and de-duplication.

Click Here for Full Article.

10 Data Storage Startups To Watch In 2015

07 Jan 2015, Posted by Jeska Rayboy in Blog

Happy New Year from Rayboy Insider Search!  Best of luck making 2015 your best year ever.  We are involved in a fast paced industry at a very exciting time. Technologies such as flash caching, cloud disaster recovery, hyper-convergence, and object storage came into their own in 2014, prompting an influx of new data storage startups. There are so many emerging technologies and technology companies it can be hard to keep up.  Below is a list of 10 data storage startups that have launched since fourth quarter of 2013. Now is the time to pay attention to them.

 

Beijing Memblaze Technology Co. Ltd.start up board game

Flagship Product: PBlaze4 Hardware Flash Accelerator Product Launch: General availability in 2015

Although technically not a startup, Memblaze is trying to break into U.S. markets. The company has been around since 2011, selling earlier iterations of its NVMe-based PBlaze PCI Express (PCIe) flash devices to Chinese hyperscale organizations. Memblaze places memory on PCIe cards rather than storage systems to enable capacity planning. PBlaze4 devices will be available in nearly 40 memory configurations using Memblaze’s Pianokey technology, which enables MLC and SLC flash to be added in 50 GB increments.

CacheBox Inc.

Flagship Product: CacheAdvance software Product Launch: August 2014

CacheBox provides a bare-metal caching software layer known as CacheAdvance that bridges hard disk and all-flash storage. The algorithm balances static and dynamic caching policies, applying block-level intelligence to manage input/output requests from high availability storage. Server-side cache and guest-level operating system cache are supported for MySQL and MongoDB environments that run Microsoft Windows Server 2008 or Linux-based storage. CacheBox’s initial release supports kernel-based virtual machine hypervisors, with VMware vSphere support on the 2015 roadmap.

To view the rest of the 2015 Data Storage Startups  CLICK HERE.

What Happens Now? Hitachi Data Systems Acquires Sepaton

21 Aug 2014, Posted by Jeska Rayboy in Blog

More consolidation happening in the storage industry, as Hitachi Data Systems acquires Sepaton. George Crump, an IT analyst whose firm focuses on data storage and virtualization, wrote an interesting article outlining why he believes this is a win-win for both sides:

Hitachi Data Systems (HDS) announced they had acquired Massachusetts-based Sepaton, an established manufacturer of purpose built backup appliances (PBBAs) that use advanced de-duplication to shorten backup times and minimize backup appliance “sprawl”. The company will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Hitachi Data Systems, which is a division of Hitachi Ltd, of Japan.

Who is Sepaton?aquire

Founded in 2001, Sepaton was one of the early entrants into the disk-based, de-duplication backup market and originally focused on replacing tape-based backup systems (Sepaton’s name is actually “No Tapes” spelled backwards). But as disk backup and de-deduplication became more mainstream, Sepaton rightly shifted their focus to the advantages of their data reduction technology, building a base of some 3000 customers.

Leveraging their ‘DeltaScale’ technology, Sepaton’s PBBAs deliver some of the fastest backup and recovery performance on the market (up to 80TB per hour) in a modular, scalable, architecture. Using byte-level de-duplication Sepaton’s systems provide some of the highest, most consistent data reduction ratios regardless of data type, enabling multiple-PB, single-system capacities.

 Did Sepaton need to do this?

Sepaton participates in the fiercely competitive purpose-built backup appliance market. They have had the advantage of focusing on enterprise-level customers with a highly scalable, high performance feature set that typically appeals to that market. Their challenge, similar to any startup or small company selling to the enterprise, is building the credibility to effectively compete. While they may have had a product that some considered better suited to the enterprise, they were at a distinct disadvantage when going up against the likes of EMC.

They also faced the reality that many of their partners eventually became competitors. For example, HP was an early advocate and OEM of Sepaton’s, but now competes directly with their StoreOnce technology. The advantage of being part of HDS is that Sepaton gets instant credibility in the market and access to HDS’s resources, channel and sales organization.

Why did HDS do this?

For their part, HDS had no serious offering in the disk backup appliance market while most of their competitors did; including HP, IBM, EMC, Dell and even Oracle. HDS does have an enterprise sales organization and providing them with a quality disk backup appliance that is differentiated from their competition should be an immediate benefit. And Sepaton does create some synergies with HDS’s existing product line. HDS has also been providing the hardware platform for Sepaton’s S2100, with their AMS2100 SAS RAID-6 based storage system.

READ MORE.

Data Protection Technologies For Cloud Environments

29 Nov 2013, Posted by Rayboy Insider Search in Blog

15374data_protectionAs companies increasing use public and private clouds, and as the data deluge continues to grow, IT administrators face a rapidly escalating backup, archive and recovery challenge. Various types of cloud deployments (i.e. public, private and hybrid) and applications have changed the rules of some traditional backup strategies, such as backup to tape or backup to disk and then to an offsite location and archive environment.

Today, backups can be taken from endpoint devices all the way to the data center and beyond to wherever the backup and archive infrastructure may exist (i.e., public cloud or a hybrid cloud environment that stages data backup between environments.) Several companies, including Datacastle, Acronis, and Sepaton, have released products that aim to help IT address today’s data protection challenges.